Boy Scouts’ Hardwork at the North House

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IMG_0069On Friday July 19, 2013, the Greenbrier Historical Society was pleased to welcome a group of 40 Ohio boy scouts to the North House. They were part of the National Boy Scout Jamboree taking place this month in Fayette county and were taking part in the hundreds of service projects spread throughout nine counties in southern West Virginia.

IMG_0076The troops at the North House spent a long, hot, and humid day outdoors – building two picnic tables and two benches, weeding and mulching the flower beds, and removing an unsightly bush and rotting tree stump from the North House lawn. Never complaining, the scouts eagerly moved from one project to the next – only taking a break to eat lunch and enjoy a guided tour of the (air conditioned) North House.IMG_0082

After all of their hard work, the scouts enjoyed an ice cream cone at The Market in Lewisburg before boarding the bus to go back to camp. The Greenbrier Historical Society would like to extend a big thank you to the boy scouts and our volunteers Max Gibson, Truman Shrewsberry, and Margaret Hambrick as well as our AmeriCorps members Megan Ramsey and Kyle Mills for all of their hard work!

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Fort McCoy Project in Williamsburg Underway

 By Dr. Kim A. McBride

When is a barn much more than a barn – when it has a two story log house/fort inside, such as with McCoy’s Fort in Williamsburg.  According to McCoy Family tradition, the William McCoy house house/fort was built in 1769, making it one of the oldest standing structures in Greenbrier County.   It is the only standing log fort we know from the region, and as such, an incredible historic resource. Frontier forts were crucial to the continued occupation of West Virginia during Lord Dunmore’s War and the American Revolution. Without them many settlers would likely have abandoned the region for safer lands to the east.

McCoy’s Fort was briefly attacked following the Battle of Fort Donnally in May 1778, but local militia repulsed this attack. Sometime after the Indian Wars the McCoy family built a larger house nearby and the old log house/fort was transformed into an outbuilding and eventually enclosed in a frame barn. This barn helped the fort to survive for nearly a century and a half, but weakened by a tornado circa 2006 and the windstorm of June 2012, the outer barn is collapsing.

The Williamsburg District Historic Foundation, with support from the Daniel K. Thorne
Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Summers County Historic Landmarks Commission, the Greenbrier Historical Society, Preservation Alliance of WV, and the WV Humanities Council, is undertaking research and restoration of this important piece of history.  Efforts are underway to dismantle the outer barn and the inner log structure.  The latter will be restored, and reassembled on-site.  But first, as soon as the structures are removed, archaeological studies will be conducted to provide information on the early structure of the fort site.

On July 17, 18, 19, 22 and 23, 2013, scouts from the Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative of the National Scout Jamboree will come to McCoy’s Fort to conduct archaeology, led by Drs. W. Stephen and Kim Arbogast McBride.  Support and volunteers are always needed, even with with future archaeology.  Anyone interested in helping please contact Dr. Kim Arbogast McBride at kim.mcbride@uky.edu, or (859) 233-4690. Those interested in helping with other aspects of the project can contact Carolyn Stephens at cbstephens23@aol.com.  Interested members can also follow the project via updates in Appalachian Spring, or digitally on the Greenbrier Historical Society’s Facebook page or Blog at greenbrierhistorical.wordpress.com.